NADbank: newspaper circulation up for all dailies

The Globe reported yesterday (B2) that it’s readership was up significantly. After piercing through the self-congratulatory rhetoric, it turns out every major daily, even the lowly Suns, are up, as well as the National Post. The numbers:

Average weekday readership grew by 10.8 per cent to 709,000 in seven largest English language markets

National Post showed a 27.4 per cent increase to 361,500

On line readership at Globe (102. per cent, combined print and net) and Post (8 per cent) increased.

In vital Toronto market, Star inched ahead 0.3 per cent, Sun by 5.4 per cent, Globe by 16.9 per cent and Post 51.4 per cent! (is it possible that PostMedia’s strategy is working?) Final comment: Star is most boring newspaper in Canada; suits its suburban readers nicely. The new Globe is actually a great improvement; forget about keeping up with net and electronic media; concentrate more on opinion, backgrounders and features.

Latest NADbank: Canadian daily newspaper use steady, some slight increases

Why is this important? Because it contrasts with the US reality of steadily declining readership, some dailies shuttered, others cutting back days of the week they come out. So the Globe and Star dominate Toronto, the “National” Post (which doesn’t distribute in six of ten provinces) hasn’t declined and is still losing money. Details below:

NADbank, March 30 2011

Newspapers hold their own

The latest NADbank survey shows only four per cent of the public read newspapers exclusively online, showing once again that the new and the old media c0-exist equally, with users dipping into both depending on the mood of the moment. It doesn’t bring in more advertising, which is what is killing all media these days, but if they can get through the Great Recession, newspapers will still be a major media — at least they don’t have to rely on the CRTC for their survival, unlike their TV counterparts.

Windsor Star, March 26 2009